Congress Rolls Back FCC Privacy Regulations

On March 28, 2017, Congress passed legislation (S.J. Res. 34) that rolled back privacy regulations recently adopted by the Federal Communications Commission. The resolution passed the Senate by a vote of 50-48 and the House by a voted of 215 to 205. This is one of several sets of regulations Congress is rolling back under the authority of the Congressional Review Act of 1996. Under this statute, Congress can nullify administrative regulations by simply passing a joint resolution of disapproval. On December 2, 2016,…
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New York Issues Final Cybersecurity Regulation

On February 13, 2017, the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) adopted the final version of its first-of-its-kind cybersecurity regulation, “Cybersecurity Requirements For Financial Services Companies” (23 NYCRR 500). This regulation took effect on March 1, 2017. The final regulation reflects several of the comments offered during the final comment period that concluded on January 27, 2017. For a prior list of significant changes from the initial version to the second version, please see our blog post located here. Most of…
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NYDFS Issues Updated Cybersecurity Regulation

The New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) recently issued an updated version of its proposed cybersecurity regulation, “Cybersecurity Requirements For Financial Services Companies” (23 NYCRR 500). The updated proposed regulation reflects several of the comments offered during the initial public notice and comment period that concluded on November 14, 2016. Some of the most noteworthy changes in the revision are as follows:
  • Section 500.04 — NYDFS clarified that while a Covered Entity must designate a qualified individual to perform the responsibilities

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Despite Recent High-Profile Dismissals, Wendy’s Shareholders Try Again with Cybersecurity-Related Derivative Lawsuit

The resilient plaintiff’s bar is not backing down from their quest to hold directors and officers personally liable for corporate misconduct that leads to cybersecurity breaches. Taking guidance from the failures which resulted in a string of dismissals of high-profile cybersecurity-related shareholder derivative lawsuits, a shareholder of the fast food-chain The Wendy’s Company is taking another shot to impose liability on corporate leadership for failing to take precautions against cyber-attacks. To be clear, these derivative cases are trying to hold the directors and officers liable…
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Lessons in Cyber-Hygiene: How John Podesta was Caught by Phishing

Instead of a Hollywood-style cyberattack into an underground bank of highly secure servers, it appears Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta fell victim to a run-of-the-mill phishing email appearing to come from Google. On March 19, 2016, Podesta received an alarming email to his Gmail account indicating someone had accessed his account, inviting Podesta to click on a Bitly URL (a service providing shortlinks, or smaller URL addresses) pointing to a longer URL that looked like a Google link. According to Bitly’s statistics, the URL…
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Lessons in Cyber-Hygiene: Securing Employee Passwords

The human element remains a significant threat vector for institutions of all sizes, and management is well advised to take proactive steps to educate and implement effective “cyber-hygiene” policies for all employees to minimize the risks associated the range of social engineering tactics, from phishing to inadvertent disclosures, as well as curb the opportunities for plain old mistakes. The area of password protection is among the most obvious areas for improvement in the world of cyber-hygiene. In a recent survey of 750 IT administrators and…
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The Yahoo Class Action: Plaintiff’s Bar Finds a New Cottage Industry

The only “surprise” in the Yahoo class action complaint, filed Friday, September 23, 2016, is that Yahoo issued a press release announcing the breach a mere one day earlier.  The class action complaint, undersigned by three law firms in San Francisco, Boca Raton, and New York, seeks certification for: “All persons within the United States whose personal information was accessed following the data breach that Yahoo announced in a press release on September 22, 2016.”  Indeed, the complaint makes a number of allegations relating directly…
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Judge Rules No Standing to Pursue Fear Of “Hacker Harm”

Last week a judge in the Southern District of Illinois trimmed several claims from a class action complaint made against Chrysler and Harman International Industries stemming from a 2015 WIRED magazine article. The July 21, 2015 WIRED article described the author’s experience of being a “digital crash-test dummy, a willing subject on whom [two hackers] could test the car-hacking research they’d been doing over the past year.” Less than two weeks after the article was published, on August 4, 2015, the plaintiffs filed their class…
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RAND Study Estimates Lower Cyber-Incident Costs

According to a new study by the RAND Corporation, published in the Oxford Journal of Cybersecurity, the average cost of a typical cyber breach for an American company has been estimated at $200,000, significantly less than the $1,000,000 figure suggested by other organizations, such as the Ponemon Institute. The study analyzed a private data set of 12,000 cyber incidents over a decade based on corporate losses compiled for the insurance industry. “Relative to all the other risks companies face, the cyber risks often aren’t…
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Plaintiffs’ Monitoring Activity to Mitigate Increased Risk of Identity Theft Sufficient for Article III Standing in the Sixth Circuit

The Sixth Circuit, in a 2-1 majority decision, has reinstated a class action lawsuit against Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, finding that the plaintiffs’ alleged “imminent, immediate and continuing increased risk” of identify fraud after hackers accessed personal data on Nationwide’s servers constituted a “cognizable injury” under Article III. The court’s unpublished decision cited a range of alleged damages from the plaintiffs’ complaint including the time and expense of monitoring their own credit, as well as a study “purporting to show that in 2011 recipients of…
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